Magical Mushrooms May Cure Social Rejection

July 26, 2016  —  By

Many of us have lived through high school and understand how it feels to be deliberately excluded from a social interaction. From being pick last in a game of volleyball to failing to land a job that you interviewed for, it is a painful process and yes, rejection in general, feels terrible.

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Don’t you wish that it was 2016 say, fifteen years ago? In the University of Zurich, researchers have discovered that magic mushrooms have psilocybin in them. Some of us may know that magic mushrooms, often made into a tea, make you hallucinate and feel like you’re in a dream, but did you know that the reason why it gives you waves of ultra good feelings or psychedelic visions of sound and color, is because of its hallucinogenic compound discovered in them. The effect of psilocybin is to relax the constraints of brain function.

The drug enters the blood stream and crosses the blood brain barrier to bind with the serotonin. Since psilocybin is similar to the neurotransmitter serotonin, it tricks the protein channels embedded in the membrane of the blood vessel into thinking that it is a form of serotonin and simply passes through.

Researchers also investigated the roots of rejection and found that humans have a fundamental need to belong. Getting rejected can afflict serious psychiatric damage to a person’s self-esteem and the pain is no different that physical injury. Rejection can hurt, a lot.

Studies were done on 21 volunteers in a game of Cyberball, also known as the Cyberball methor, certain players were deliberately excluded from receiving a catch. However, half of the players were given a dose of psilocybin and the other received placebo, a substance that benefits the player psychologically. The results were astounding. Players who took psilocybin displayed minimal activities in the brain, parts where social pain usually process in.

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“It’s really important to understand what’s going on the brain when we interact socially,” said lead researcher, Katrin Preller. “Identifying these brain processes is extremely helpful if we think of future medications.”

The importance of helping people suffering from social rejection or depression, is clearly needed because no matter how hard a person tries to overcome their daily struggles with social rejection, people are bound to get hurt by ostracism.

Although studies have shown that this magical mushroom can somewhat help solve society’s petty little differences and ways, we all need to learn to get along, smile often and just simply learn how to live healthily without any need for any types of drugs, no matter how magical the drug can be.